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2. Post-Photography Should Not Be Curated?

For my second post, I’d like to dwell a little longer on the question of how contemporary photographic practices and technologies are curated institutionally. The issue facing photography curators today is that ‘the digital’ – as it is typically invoked – is not simply a new photographic medium but a hybrid and converged set of socio-technical practices generating alternative image economies, sites of expertise and cultural value. more

Published: 29.10.2019
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1. Know Your Bounce Rate

In February 2011, Google released “Panda”, the first of several updates to its PageRank algorithm. The release aimed to discipline rogue webmasters, and prevent sites with poor quality content from polluting Google’s top search results. With it came the imposition of a new metric of value: freshness. Those seeking credibility within Google’s scopic regime were advised by specialists to generate new and dynamic content that’s ‘engaging, entertaining, enlightening and/or inspiring’ across all available media channels. more

Published: 16.09.2019
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15.09.–15.11.2019

Katrina Sluis’ blog series “Photography Must Be Curated!” explores the diffusion and intensification of curation in an era of photographic post-scarcity. As curating becomes a practice and process made operational in network culture, and a problem to be solved by the computer sciences, what does this mean for those traditionally charged with the exhibition, collection and interpretation of photography? By focusing on the practices of technologists, digital marketers and platform users, the series aims to create new vectors between the previously separated fields of institutional curating, social media curating and computational curating. In doing so, the series ultimately seeks to explore what a practice of post-photographic curating might look like.

show series
2. Post-Photography Should Not Be Curated?

For my second post, I’d like to dwell a little longer on the question of how contemporary photographic practices and technologies are curated institutionally. The issue facing photography curators today is that ‘the digital’ – as it is typically invoked – is not simply a new photographic medium but a hybrid and converged set of socio-technical practices generating alternative image economies, sites of expertise and cultural value. more

Published: 29.10.2019
0 comments
1. Know Your Bounce Rate

In February 2011, Google released “Panda”, the first of several updates to its PageRank algorithm. The release aimed to discipline rogue webmasters, and prevent sites with poor quality content from polluting Google’s top search results. With it came the imposition of a new metric of value: freshness. Those seeking credibility within Google’s scopic regime were advised by specialists to generate new and dynamic content that’s ‘engaging, entertaining, enlightening and/or inspiring’ across all available media channels. more

Published: 16.09.2019
0 comments
15.09.–15.11.2019

Katrina Sluis’ blog series “Photography Must Be Curated!” explores the diffusion and intensification of curation in an era of photographic post-scarcity. As curating becomes a practice and process made operational in network culture, and a problem to be solved by the computer sciences, what does this mean for those traditionally charged with the exhibition, collection and interpretation of photography? By focusing on the practices of technologists, digital marketers and platform users, the series aims to create new vectors between the previously separated fields of institutional curating, social media curating and computational curating. In doing so, the series ultimately seeks to explore what a practice of post-photographic curating might look like.

show series